Drama

Die Generaal/The General (2009)

I first heard Bok van Blerk’s song ‘De la Rey’ at the Aardklop Arts Festival in September 2006 just as it was becoming a huge hit and the source of much political hand-wringing. This play features a very different kind of general, a hardened criminal who aspires to become a general in one of the notorious prison gangs.  I’ve chosen the title first as a reference to the song, since it will strike a chord within the primary market of the play. It also serves as an ironic reminder that the general of the play is in many ways a monster created by the past who now brings a kind of liberation for black and white, speakers of Afrikaans, other indigenous language and English, through their common experience of criminal violence, or the fear of it.

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Two to Tango (2006)

Andrew Stark and Liza Boyle have been married for sixteen years.  And it shows. It shows in the way they take each other for granted.  In their bickering about little things.  And in their different expectations about sex.

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Dinner Talk (1996)

Post 1994, many people asked the question, “What will you write about now that apartheid has gone?” I wrote Dinner Talk, a trilogy of two-handers each dealing with a completely different contemporary South African theme, to show that, in fact, there was a great deal more to explore in the emerging democratic era than in the ‘us-them’ apartheid past.  The title alludes to the kinds of themes that people spoke about at dinner time as an indication of contemporary concerns that could form the basis of contemporary South African drama.

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Brothers in Blood (2009)

Brothers in Blood explores the religious and racial fault lines of our society, where ignorance about the other, religious arrogance and racial prejudice combine to alienate human beings from each other...even those who might have many things in common.

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Green Man Flashing (2004)

Green Man Flashing is a fast-paced political thriller written in a filmic style. It explores themes of personal and political violence, as well as the lengths people will go to in the name of greater political good. All this is played out against the backdrop of a young democracy still dealing with its racist history, but where violence against women is of national crisis proportions. Green Man Flashing takes on the challenge of deep moral and political questions for which there are no easy answers and provides insight into the very real themes that occupy thinking South Africans.

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Mixed Metaphors (2006)

It is 2006.  Two young women in their early twenties meet.  Both are daughters of 1976-generation activists.  They meet 30 years after the student uprisings that were a watershed in South African political history.  One, Lerato, is a performance poet who, despite the changes in the country, is still politically aware and committed.  The other, Cindy, is a Model C school graduate who believes that the struggle is over, and now its fruits are to be enjoyed.From their initial antagonistic meeting, they become friends and later discover just how intimately their histories are linked. 

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Hostile Takeover (2005)

Mr Green owns a strip-club.  In fact, he owns three.  He’s a businessman.  A very successful businessman.  So successful that he’s the target for a takeover by former MP, Johnny Mabuso.  Mabuso’s now a black empowerment player.  He’s backed by a Chinese consortium.  Mr Green’s not keen on black economic empowerment.  Broad-based or otherwise.  He runs a club selling broads.  That’s good enough for him.

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Some Mothers’ Sons (2006)

The play concerns two individuals who both experience violence in intensely personal manners; one, as a detainee during apartheid and the other, as a person living in a city now wracked by violent crime. As opposed to them being dismissed or forgotten as statistics, the play title reminds us that these are human beings; they are not faceless numbers, but rather, they are some mothers’ sons.

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The Tables Trilogy (1999)

The Tables Trilogy comprises of three independent pieces, the unifying feature in each is the multi-functional use of tables. It explores universal issues rooted in local experience such as the cyclical nature of oppression and resistance (one group oppresses another, the oppressed come to rule and oppress others); truth and reconciliation, crime and the arms trade. It also satirizes the elusive promise of freedom, with directions to freedom being changed constantly, and freedom escaping from those who were just about to embrace it.

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Iago’s Last Dance (2009)

Iago’s Last Dance is a trilogy of plays about betrayal and vengeance, set against the backdrop of the 'three-letter plague' – HIV and AIDS. Moving from betrayal within a marriage to betrayal of friendship and finally, betrayal by the larger society, they create a powerful intertext with South African HIV/AIDS statistics and policy.

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